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Guide to Everyday Workplace Coaching Conversations

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Coaching conversations at work are fundamental to your organization’s well-being and growth.

Put plain and simple, powerful perspectives, goal setting, and regular progress-calibration meetups – what coaching is essentially all about – are only going to push your people forward and motivate them to work on the things that really light their fire.

And well, motivated and engaged people are hard and smart-working people, and having them on your team can only benefit your organization.

Now, effective coaching isn’t just about helping employees solve big problems or making drastic improvements in their work.

It is also an important part of their continuous development and performance management.

Therefore, for the overall success of your company (and the focus lays on the people sustaining this success), consider developing a practice of everyday coaching conversations with your employees and colleagues.

In other words, commit to continuous learning.

Invest valuable time in coaching conversations to help expand people’s perspectives and an array of choices. One way to help them see more and be more is through powerful yet simple coaching questions, be it in regards to the development of your employees, or your own personal growth. (Check out our one-to-one coaching program to kick-start this process.)

 

Coaching conversations involves curiosity and unlocking perspectives through powerful yet simple questions. Here are 5 to start with:

 

What’s on your mind right now?

An open-ended question is the best way to kickstart the conversation. Be kind and present, when asking as well as when receiving the answer. Emotional intelligence is indispensable in the coaching process, make sure you integrate it into your practice.

 

What is working well right now?

It is scientifically proven that we focus more on the bad things than the good ones.

Help your people acknowledge the things that have been going well and give them recognition for the hard work they have been putting in.

Your recognition can oftentimes ignite the moment of acknowledgement, lighting up the coachee’s path towards improvement. 

 

What do you think that is holding you back at the moment?

Having your coachee express the challenges that they have been going through can: (1) kick-start the solution-hunting process and (2) provide the opportunity for you to better understand where the person is coming from.

If you then find it to be the case, continue with: ”Does the problem really lie in the task at hand or the way you feel about the task?”. Exploring our emotions when dealing with an issue can provide valuable information.

 

What other support/resources do you need to get this done? What do you need from me right now?

This powerful question shows the other that you care about their needs and desires.

A leader’s top priority should be removing the barriers that people on their team may encounter on their way toward carrying out the organization’s goal.

It is essential that people feel comfortable bringing these things up and asking for help.

 

What’s one thing that you have learned today?

With a focus on continuous learning, this is always a good question to end the conversation.

It invites the coachee to come to a conclusion about what has been going on in the workplace for them as well as formulate a takeaway from your session.

 

Have this open and caring conversation as often as you both feel is necessary.

Check-in often.

Ask for and offer help.

And remember, do it with kindness, always.

 

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